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Ransomware

Articles about removing Windows lockers, Browser lockers, Crypto-viruses and other types of blackmailing threats.

How to remove Powz Ransomware and decrypt .powz files

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Powz Ransomware is a variant of the STOP/Djvu ransomware family, known for encrypting files on infected systems and demanding a ransom for their decryption. This ransomware appends the .powz extension to the filenames of encrypted files, rendering them inaccessible to the user. The primary goal of Powz ransomware is to extort money from victims by holding their data hostage until a ransom is paid. Once Powz ransomware infects a system, it scans for files to encrypt. It uses the Salsa20 encryption algorithm, which, while not the strongest, still provides a significant challenge for decryption without the proper key. For example, document.docx becomes document.docx.powz. After encrypting the files, Powz ransomware creates a ransom note named _readme.txt in each folder containing encrypted files. This note provides instructions for contacting the attackers via email (support@fishmail.top or datarestorehelp@airmail.cc) and details the ransom amount, which ranges from $490 to $980, depending on how quickly the victim contacts the attackers. The note also offers to decrypt one file for free as proof that decryption is possible.

How to remove Kkll Ransomware and decrypt .kkll files

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Kkll Ransomware is a malicious program that belongs to the Djvu ransomware family. It is designed to encrypt files on the victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible, and then demands a ransom for their decryption. This type of ransomware is particularly insidious because it not only locks users out of their files but also pressures them into paying a ransom to regain access. Once Kkll ransomware infects a system, it scans for various file types, including images, documents, and videos, and encrypts them. The encrypted files are then appended with the .kkll extension. For example, a file named photo.jpg would be renamed to photo.jpg.kkll after encryption. Kkll ransomware uses sophisticated encryption algorithms to lock files. The exact encryption method is not always disclosed, but it typically involves strong encryption standards that are difficult to break without the decryption key. The ransomware generates a unique key for each victim, which is required to decrypt the files. After encrypting the files, Kkll ransomware creates a ransom note named _readme.txt in all affected folders. This note informs the victim that their files have been encrypted and provides instructions on how to pay the ransom to obtain the decryption key. The ransom note typically includes a statement that the files have been encrypted and can only be decrypted with a unique key, the ransom amount (usually $980, but can be reduced to $490 if the victim contacts the attackers within 72 hours), instructions to send an email to the provided addresses (e.g., helpmanager@mail.ch and restoremanager@airmail.cc) to get further instructions, and an offer to decrypt one file for free as proof that decryption is possible.

How to remove DORRA Ransomware and decrypt .DORRA files

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DORRA Ransomware is a malicious software variant from the Makop ransomware family, designed to encrypt files on a victim's computer, making them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. This ransomware typically spreads through phishing emails, malicious advertisements, drive-by downloads, and pirated software. Once it infects a computer, DORRA encrypts files using strong encryption algorithms such as AES, Salsa20, and RSA, and appends the .DORRA extension to the filenames. For example, 1.jpg becomes 1.jpg.[2AF20FA3].[dorradocry@outlook.com].DORRA. After encryption, DORRA generates a ransom note named +README-WARNING+.txt, which informs the victim that their files have been encrypted and stolen. The note warns against attempting to decrypt the files independently, as this could corrupt them and lead to permanent data loss. It instructs the victim to contact the attackers via the provided email address (dorradocry@outlook.com) and to send their unique ID, embedded in the filenames, to receive further instructions on how to decrypt their files. The note also threatens to publish the victim's data on the internet if the ransom is not paid.

How to remove Trinity Ransomware and decrypt .trinitylock files

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Trinity Ransomware is a newly identified strain of ransomware that has recently emerged as a significant threat in the cybercrime landscape. Discovered by Cyble Research and Intelligence Labs (CRIL) on May 10, 2024, Trinity employs a sophisticated double extortion technique, combining data encryption with the threat of revealing sensitive information to coerce victims into paying a ransom. This ransomware shares notable similarities with the Venus ransomware, particularly in its use of specific register values and mutex naming conventions. Upon successful infection, Trinity ransomware encrypts user files and appends a .trinitylock extension to them. This alteration of file extensions is a common tactic used by ransomware to signal that the files have been compromised and to prevent easy access without decryption. After encrypting the files, Trinity ransomware generates a ransom note (README.txt), typically placed in various directories on the infected system. The note demands payment in exchange for the decryption key and threatens to release sensitive exfiltrated data if the ransom is not paid. The exact content and format of the ransom note can vary, but it generally includes instructions on how to make the payment, often in cryptocurrency, and may provide a sample file decryption to prove the effectiveness of their decryptor.

How to remove Lord Bomani Ransomware and decrypt .[Bomani@Email.CoM] files

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Lord Bomani Ransomware is a type of malware that belongs to the GlobeImposter family. It encrypts files on the victim's computer and appends the developer's email address (Bomani@Email.CoM) to the filenames. For example, a file named 1.jpg would be renamed to 1.jpg.[Bomani@Email.CoM]. The ransomware also creates a ransom note named Read Me!.hTa which informs the victim that their files have been encrypted due to a security issue on their PC. The note provides three email addresses for contacting the attackers: lord_bomani@keemail.me, jbomani@protonmail.com, and bomani@email.com. It also includes a specific ID that must be provided in the subject line when emailing the attackers. The ransom note states that payment for file decryption must be made in Bitcoin, and the cost depends on how quickly the victim contacts the threat actors. It warns against renaming files or attempting to use third-party decryption tools, and it threatens to release sensitive personal data if the ransom is not paid. The note also offers to decrypt up to three files for free as a guarantee, provided the total size of the files is less than 5MB and they do not contain valuable information.

How to remove Malware Mage Ransomware and decrypt .malwaremage files

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Malware Mage Ransomware is a type of malicious software that encrypts data on an infected computer and demands a ransom for its decryption. Discovered during a routine investigation of new submissions to the VirusTotal platform, this ransomware appends the .malwaremage extension to encrypted files. For instance, a file named 1.jpg would appear as 1.jpg.malwaremage after encryption. The ransomware then displays a pop-up window containing the ransom note. The ransom note informs victims that their documents, videos, images, and other files have been encrypted using the AES-256 cryptographic algorithm. To recover the inaccessible data, victims are instructed to purchase a decryption key from the attackers. The ransom amount is 0.08134 BTC, which is approximately six thousand US dollars, though this value can fluctuate with exchange rates. The note emphasizes that failure to pay within the given time frame will result in the destruction of the decryption key, leading to permanent data loss.

How to remove LOTUS Ransomware and decrypt .LOTUS files

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LOTUS Ransomware is a type of malware that encrypts files on a victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. It belongs to the Dharma ransomware family and is designed to extort money from victims by holding their data hostage. After installation, it displays a ransom message in a pop-up window and creates a text file named MANUAL.txt containing further instructions. LOTUS Ransomware appends the .LOTUS extension to the names of encrypted files. Additionally, it includes the victim's ID and the attacker's email address in the filename. For example, a file named 1.jpg would be renamed to 1.jpg.id-B4M9F983.[paymei@cock.li].LOTUS. After encrypting files, LOTUS ransomware creates a ransom note named "MANUAL.txt" and places it in each folder containing encrypted files. The note typically includes a notification of file encryption, instructions on how to pay the ransom (often in cryptocurrency like Bitcoin), and contact information for the attackers (e.g., paymei@cock.li, paymei@tuta.io). It also warns victims not to rename files or try to decrypt them with third-party software, as this may cause permanent damage to the files. The ransom note emphasizes that victims can only receive a decryption key or software from the attackers.

How to remove Wormhole Ransomware and decrypt .Wormhole files

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Wormhole Ransomware is a type of malicious software designed to encrypt files on a victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. This ransomware variant is part of a broader category of malware that uses encryption to hold data hostage, demanding payment for the decryption key. The name "Wormhole" is derived from the file extension it appends to encrypted files. Once Wormhole ransomware encrypts files on a victim's computer, it appends the .Wormhole extension to the encrypted files. This extension helps victims and cybersecurity professionals identify the type of ransomware that has infected the system. Wormhole ransomware employs strong encryption algorithms to secure the victim's files. Typically, ransomware uses a combination of symmetric and asymmetric encryption. Symmetric encryption involves using a single key for both encryption and decryption, with AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) being commonly used due to its efficiency and security. Asymmetric encryption involves a pair of keys – a public key for encryption and a private key for decryption, with RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) often used for this purpose. The exact encryption methods used by Wormhole ransomware are not detailed in the sources, but it is likely to use a combination of AES for file encryption and RSA for securing the AES key, similar to other ransomware variants. After encrypting the files, Wormhole ransomware typically creates a ransom note to inform the victim of the attack and provide instructions for payment (How to recover files encrypted by Wormhole.txt). This note is usually placed in prominent locations such as the desktop or in each directory containing encrypted files. The ransom note may include instructions on how to pay the ransom, often in cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, a deadline for payment to avoid permanent data loss, and contact information for the attackers, often an email address or a link to a dark web site.