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Useful tutorials on various PC troubleshooting topics. Video tutorials.

How to stop “Saved Passwords Were Found Online” e-mail spam

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Saved Passwords Were Found Online email scam is a type of phishing email that falsely claims that some of the recipient's saved passwords have been exposed online due to a data breach from a website or application they use. The email typically includes a call to action, urging the recipient to review their passwords immediately by clicking on a "Check passwords" button or link. This link, however, leads to a fraudulent webpage designed to capture the recipient's login credentials and other sensitive information.

How to remove CAMBIARE ROTTA Ransomware and decrypt encrypted files

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CAMBIARE ROTTA Ransomware is a type of cryptographic malware designed to encrypt files on a victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. Unlike typical ransomware, CAMBIARE ROTTA is geopolitically motivated, specifically targeting Italian users as a form of punishment for Italy's geopolitical stance, particularly its alliance with Israel. This ransomware is part of the Chaos Ransomware family and is notable for its ideological rather than financial motivations. Once CAMBIARE ROTTA Ransomware infects a computer, it encrypts files using strong encryption algorithms such as AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) for file encryption and RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) for encrypting the AES key. The ransomware appends a random four-character extension to the filenames of encrypted files. For example, a file named document.pdf might be renamed to document.pdf.kg4v. After encrypting the files, CAMBIARE ROTTA Ransomware changes the desktop wallpaper and generates a ransom note titled Leggimi.txt (Italian for "ReadMe.txt"). The note contains a political message rather than instructions for paying a ransom. It states that Italy must be punished for its alliance with Israel and informs victims that there is no option for data recovery. This indicates that the primary motive behind CAMBIARE ROTTA is political rather than financial.

How to remove Watz Ransomware and decrypt .watz files

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Watz Ransomware is a variant of the STOP/DJVU ransomware family, a notorious group of file-encrypting malware. This ransomware encrypts files on the victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible, and demands a ransom payment in exchange for a decryption key. The primary goal of Watz Ransomware, like other ransomware, is to extort money from victims by holding their data hostage. Once Watz Ransomware infects a system, it encrypts files and appends the .watz extension to the filenames. For example, a file named document.docx would be renamed to document.docx.watz. Watz Ransomware employs a combination of AES-256 and RSA-2048 encryption algorithms. AES-256 is used to encrypt the files, while RSA-2048 is used to encrypt the AES key. This dual-layer encryption ensures that decrypting the files without the private key held by the attackers is nearly impossible. After encrypting the files, Watz Ransomware creates a ransom note named _readme.txt in each folder containing encrypted files. The ransom note typically includes instructions on how to pay the ransom, the amount demanded (usually in cryptocurrency), and contact information for the attackers. The note may also offer a "discount" if the ransom is paid within a specified timeframe.

How to remove Waqa Ransomware and decrypt .waqa files

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Waqa Ransomware is a type of malicious software that belongs to the STOP/DJVU ransomware family. It is designed to encrypt files on the victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. This ransomware is particularly notorious for its ability to cause significant damage by locking down personal photos, documents, and other important files. After successfully encrypting files, Waqa Ransomware appends the .waqa extension to the affected files. For example, a file named document.docx would be renamed to document.docx.waqa. Upon completing the encryption process, Waqa Ransomware generates a ransom note, typically named _readme.txt. This note is placed in every folder containing encrypted files. The ransom note informs the victim that their files have been encrypted and provides instructions on how to pay the ransom to obtain the decryption key. It often includes contact information for the attackers and a demand for payment in cryptocurrency, such as Bitcoin. Waqa Ransomware employs a combination of AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) and RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) encryption algorithms. AES is used to encrypt the files, while RSA is used to encrypt the AES key, making decryption without the private key extremely difficult.

How to remove Anyv Ransomware and decrypt .anyv files

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Anyv Ransomware is a type of malicious software classified under ransomware, specifically designed to encrypt a victim's data and demand a ransom for its decryption. This form of malware renders files inaccessible by appending a unique extension and then coercing the victim to pay for the decryption key. The primary goal of Anyv ransomware, like other ransomware variants, is to extort money from its victims by holding their data hostage. After encrypting files, Anyv ransomware appends a unique extension (.anyv) to the filenames. The format of the new filename is as follows: original_filename.{random_string}.Anyv. Anyv ransomware employs strong encryption algorithms to lock the victim's files. While the specific encryption algorithm used by Anyv is not detailed in the available sources, ransomware typically uses a combination of symmetric (e.g., AES) and asymmetric (e.g., RSA) encryption methods. This dual approach ensures that files are securely encrypted and that decryption is only possible with the private key held by the attackers. Upon completing the encryption process, Anyv ransomware generates a ransom note named README.TXT. This note informs the victim that their files have been encrypted and provides instructions on how to pay the ransom to obtain the decryption tool.

How to remove SRC Ransomware and decrypt .SRC files

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SRC Ransomware is a malicious software variant that belongs to the Makop family of ransomware. It is designed to infiltrate computer systems, encrypt files, and demand a ransom for their decryption. Upon encrypting files, SRC Ransomware appends a unique extension to the filenames, which includes the victim's ID, a contact email address (restoreBackup@cock.li), and the .SRC extension. For example, a file named 1.jpg would be renamed to 1.jpg.[6BH2N0X3].[RestoreBackup@cock.li].SRC. This renaming scheme not only signifies that the file has been encrypted but also provides victims with a means to contact the attackers. The encryption method used by SRC Ransomware is not explicitly detailed in the provided sources. However, ransomware variants, including those from the Makop family, commonly employ robust encryption algorithms such as AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) and RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman). SRC Ransomware generates a ransom note named +README-WARNING+.txt, which is placed on the victim's desktop. This note informs victims that their files have been encrypted and outlines the steps required to pay the ransom for decryption. It provides contact details, including an email address and a TOX ID, for negotiating the ransom payment. The note also warns against using third-party decryption tools or altering encrypted files, as these actions may lead to permanent data loss.

How to play Sea of Thieves on Mac

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Sea of Thieves, developed by Rare and published by Microsoft Studios, has captivated players with its unique blend of adventure, exploration, and player interaction in a vast, open-world pirate setting. Players are given the liberty to explore a beautifully crafted world filled with secrets, treasures, and dangers. The game's emphasis on exploration and discovery taps into the adventurous spirit of its players. At its core, Sea of Thieves is a shared-world experience where players can form crews with friends or strangers, leading to memorable encounters filled with cooperation, betrayal, and competition. This social aspect is a significant draw for many players. The game's world is ever-changing, with wild weather, special events, and encounters with other crews ensuring that no two journeys are the same. This dynamic nature keeps the gameplay fresh and exciting. Sea of Thieves encourages players to tackle challenges in their own unique ways, offering a variety of tools and strategies for overcoming obstacles. Additionally, the game allows for extensive customization of ships and characters, enabling players to express their individuality. The year 2024 brings exciting updates and features to Sea of Thieves. Updates have been made to enhance the gameplay experience, including safer seas for Tall Tales, new voyages, and improvements to session times, making the game more accessible and enjoyable for both casual and hardcore players. Officially, Sea of Thieves is not supported on macOS. However, there are workarounds for Mac users who wish to play the game. One method involves using Boot Camp to install Windows on Intel-based Macs, allowing them to run Sea of Thieves as if on a PC. For M Mac users, options are more limited due to the lack of Boot Camp support, but cloud gaming services, Crossover and Parallels offer a viable alternative.

How to remove TransCrypt Ransomware and decrypt encrypted files

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TransCrypt Ransomware is a malicious software that belongs to the Chaos ransomware family, known for its capability to encrypt files on the infected computers, rendering them inaccessible to the users. This article delves into the intricacies of TransCrypt Ransomware, including its infection mechanism, the file extensions it appends, the encryption method it employs, the ransom note it generates, the availability of decryption tools, and the steps to recover files encrypted by this ransomware. Upon encrypting files, TransCrypt appends a random extension to the filenames, which consists of four characters. This alteration not only signifies that the files have been encrypted but also serves as a marker for the ransomware, distinguishing affected files from unaffected ones. TransCrypt employs a robust encryption algorithm to lock the files on the infected computer. The ransomware is derived from the Chaos ransomware, indicating that it likely uses a combination of symmetric and asymmetric encryption methods to secure the files beyond the reach of the victims without the decryption key. This encryption is designed to be unbreakable without the specific decryption key held by the attackers. After the encryption process is complete, TransCrypt drops a ransom note named RECOVERFILES.txt on the victim's computer. This note informs the victim about the encryption and demands a ransom payment for the decryption key. The ransom note specifies the amount, usually in Bitcoin, and provides instructions on how to make the payment. It also includes contact information for the attackers, typically an email address, to facilitate communication regarding the payment.