Tutorials

Useful tutorials on various PC troubleshooting topics. Video tutorials.

How to stop “Have You Heard About Pegasus?” e-mail spam

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Have You Heard About Pegasus? email scam is a type of sextortion and phishing campaign that exploits the notoriety of the Pegasus spyware to intimidate recipients. The scam emails falsely claim that the sender has compromised the recipient's device with Pegasus spyware and has obtained sensitive or compromising information. The scammer then demands a ransom, typically in Bitcoin, to prevent the release of this information. Spam campaigns, also known as malspam, are a common method used by cybercriminals to distribute malware. These campaigns send out emails en masse, which may contain malicious attachments or links. When a recipient clicks on these links or opens the attachments, their device can become infected with malware. The types of malicious files used in these campaigns can vary, including documents, executables, archives, JavaScript files, and more.

How to remove Cdcc Ransomware and decrypt .cdcc files

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Cdcc Ransomware is a variant of the STOP/DJVU ransomware family, known for encrypting personal files on infected devices and appending the .cdcc extension to filenames. It targets a wide range of file types, rendering them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. For example, 1.jpg would become 1.jpg.cdcc. The ransomware employs the Salsa20 encryption algorithm, which is strong and requires a unique key for decryption. After encrypting files, Cdcc Ransomware creates a ransom note named _readme.txt and places it in every folder containing encrypted files, as well as on the desktop, ensuring the victim is aware of the attack. The main purpose of the article is to be informative, providing detailed information about Cdcc Ransomware, its infection methods, the encryption it uses, the ransom note it creates, and the possibilities for decryption, including the use of tools like the Emsisoft STOP Djvu decryptor.

How to remove Cdxx Ransomware and decrypt .cdxx files

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Cdxx Ransomware is a variant of the notorious STOP/DJVU ransomware family. It is a type of malware that encrypts personal files on infected devices, such as photos, documents, and databases, and appends the .cdxx extension to the filenames, effectively restricting access to these files until a ransom is paid. For example, document.pdf would be renamed to document.pdf.cdxx. The ransomware employs robust encryption algorithms, making the files inaccessible without a decryption key. Cdxx Ransomware creates a ransom note named _readme.txt in every directory where files have been encrypted. This note contains instructions from the attackers on how to pay the ransom and contact them. The ransom amount typically ranges from $999 to $1999, payable in Bitcoin. Cdxx Ransomware typically spreads through malicious downloads, email attachments, and phishing campaigns. Attackers use social engineering tactics to trick users into executing the ransomware on their systems. Once activated, Cdxx Ransomware scans the system for files to encrypt, avoiding system directories and certain file extensions like .ini, .bat, .dll, .lnk, and .sys.

How to remove Xrp Ransomware and decrypt .xrp files

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XRP Ransomware is a type of malicious software that belongs to the GlobeImposter ransomware family. Its primary function is to encrypt files on a victim's computer, rendering them inaccessible. The ransomware appends an email address and the .xrp extension to filenames, indicating that the files have been encrypted. Upon infecting a computer, XRP Ransomware scans the entire hard drive for files and locks them. For example, it changes 1.jpg to 1.jpg.[a.wyper@bejants.com].xrp. Ransomware typically employs symmetric or asymmetric encryption. Symmetric encryption uses the same key for both encryption and decryption, while asymmetric encryption utilizes two distinct keys - one for encryption and another for decryption. XRP Ransomware creates a ransom note named Read_For_Restore_File.html in each folder containing encrypted files. The ransom note typically instructs victims on how to pay a ransom to decrypt their files.

How to remove SDfghjkl Ransomware and decrypt .SDfghjkl files

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SDfghjkl Ransomware is a type of malware that belongs to the Paradise ransomware family, discovered by a researcher named Raby. It is designed to encrypt data on infected computers, rendering the files inaccessible to users, and then demands a ransom payment in Bitcoin for the decryption key. During the encryption process, SDfghjkl Ransomware renames all affected files by appending a specific pattern to the file names: _{fiasco911@protonmail.com}SDfghjkl. For instance, 1.jpg would be renamed to 1.jpg _{fiasco911@protonmail.com}SDfghjkl. The exact cryptographic algorithm used by SDfghjkl is not specified in the provided sources, but it is common for ransomware to use strong symmetric or asymmetric encryption algorithms. SDfghjkl Ransomware creates a text file (Instructions with your files.txt) on the desktop and displays a pop-up window with a detailed ransom message. The message informs victims that their data has been encrypted and provides instructions on how to contact the attackers via the provided email address (fiasco911@protonmail.com) to negotiate the ransom payment.

How to stop “MINISTÉRIO PUBLICO PORTUGAL” e-mail spam

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MINISTÉRIO PUBLICO PORTUGAL email spam is a malicious spam campaign that falsely claims to be from the Public Prosecution Service of Portugal, notifying recipients that they are under investigation for tax fraud. This email is not associated with any legitimate body of Portugal's Judiciary. The email is a form of malspam, a malicious spam that carries threats such as trojans, password-stealing viruses, banking malware, and spyware. Spam campaigns infect computers by tricking users into opening malicious files or links. These files or links are often disguised as "official", "important", or "urgent" to deceive users into trusting them. For instance, the "MINISTÉRIO PUBLICO PORTUGAL" email scam lures recipients into opening a virulent file promoted through it. If a user opens the attachment, malicious macros or JavaScript can download malware into the system.

How to remove SNet Ransomware and decrypt .SNet files

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SNet Ransomware is a formidable cyberthreat that was first spotted in October 2021. It encrypts a user's files, rendering them inaccessible until a ransom is paid. The ransomware poses a serious risk to both individuals and organizations, with high-profile cases including a major hospital and a banking institution. Once SNet ransomware has infiltrated a system, it encrypts files and adds the .SNet extension to their filenames. For example, a file originally named "document.docx" would be renamed to "document.docx.SNet". The ransomware uses a combination of AES-256 and RSA-1024 encryption algorithms to encrypt files. These advanced encryption tactics make it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to decrypt the files without the specific decryption key. After the encryption process, SNet ransomware drops a ransom note named DecryptNote.txt. This note informs the victim about the encryption and demands a ransom, typically ranging from $490 to $980 in Bitcoin, for the decryption key.

How to remove CoV Ransomware and decrypt .CoV files

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CoV Ransomware is a type of malicious software that belongs to the Xorist family. It was discovered during an analysis of samples uploaded to VirusTotal. This ransomware targets Windows operating systems and encrypts user files, rendering them inaccessible. Once a computer is infected, CoV encrypts files and appends the .CoV extension to filenames. For example, it changes 1.jpg to 1.jpg.CoV, 2.png to 2.png.CoV, and so forth. The specific encryption method used by CoV ransomware is not explicitly mentioned in the search results, but ransomware typically uses either symmetric or asymmetric encryption. CoV Ransomware generates a ransom note in a file named HOW TO DECRYPT FILES.txt. This note informs the victim that all crucial files have been encrypted and provides instructions for decryption. A payment of 0.03 Bitcoin is demanded, with a specific Bitcoin address provided for the transaction.